What's your news flash? Send it to ed@edhat.com login  twitter  facebook  RSS 
 
 
 

 
Advertise on Edhat
Advertise on Edhat
 
News Events Referrals Deals Classifieds Comments About

Javelinas
updated: Nov 28, 2012, 11:05 AM

By Edhat Subscriber

Javelinas (Peccary) at Coronado National Forest in Arizona, last week, Thanksgiving.

Send this picture as a postcard

# # # #

Send this picture as a postcard

# # # #

Southeast Arizona's Coronado National Forest, Cave Creek Visitor Information Center

Send this picture as a postcard

# # # #

Send this picture as a postcard

# # # #

Comments in order of when they were received | (reverse order)

 COMMENT 347744 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-28 11:18 AM

Very interesting. I have never seen one.

 

 COMMENT 347749P agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-28 11:26 AM

Rather rundown looking visitor center.

 

 COMMENT 347753P agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-28 11:32 AM

Looks like a relative of the boar.

 

 COMMENT 347759 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-28 11:41 AM

They are aggressive little creatures. My friend lives in Tucson and they often run around the neighborhoods..eewwee. Very interesting animal.

 

 COMMENT 347763P agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-28 11:47 AM

Nice shots! Such beautiful country.
My brother-in-law hunts for Javelinas with a bow and arrow. He says they've got horrible eyesight but a great sense of smell. He says you can sneak up very close to them if you stay downwind.

 

 COMMENT 347768 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-28 11:59 AM

I have never heard of them, but then I've only been to Arizona once. I looked them up & they are most interesting. Pretty country for sure.

 

 COMMENT 347785 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-28 12:15 PM

Winner Winnner Javelina DINNER!

 

 COMMENT 347793 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-28 12:24 PM

OMG, did you feed them table scraps!!1!

 

 COMMENT 347797 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-28 12:28 PM

They will sleep right next to you for warmth! True story!

 

 COMMENT 347801 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-28 12:39 PM

wow cool. Bigger than I had thought.

 

 COMMENT 347803 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-28 12:41 PM

Thank you for stopping to take their picture rather than speed up to take their lives.

 

 COMMENT 347820 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-28 01:39 PM

Dat right der is a skunk pig. Good eatin' as well as good for glove making wit der hides.

 

 COMMENT 347830 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-28 01:53 PM

They will turn and charge you if they feel the need.

 

 COMMENT 347906 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-28 04:16 PM

I lived outside Tucson when I was in grad school and they would get into our trash then spend more time fighting over the spoils than eating whatever was there (not much since we were students). They do taste good when bbq'd in a pit.

 

 COMMENT 347921 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-28 04:56 PM

Never heard of a peccary or javelina before. I always enjoy learning something new.

 

 COMMENT 347935 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-28 05:50 PM

I love me some javelinas. There is no finer form of pestilence and determination.

 

 COMMENT 347958 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-28 06:22 PM

803, do people deliberately crash their cars into large mammals where you live?

 

 COMMENT 348022P agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-28 10:33 PM

I'm not a hunter, but my former neighbor was, he would got to Texas and return with Javelina Jerky to share - not too bad, but I prefer Turkey of regular beef jerky.

 

 ANDY agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-29 06:48 AM

I adopted an orphaned javalina when I was a kid. I named him Gregory Peccary. He was very sweet and followed me everywhere. Loved saltines as a special treat. We ended up taking him back to our ranch where he thrived. He became good friends with our Catahoula dogs. Catahoulas are also known as Leopard dogs. They are cattle dogs.

 

 COMMENT 348094P agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-29 08:22 AM

Wild pigs, javelinas, are very destructive to farmland/vineyards/gold courses, etc., as they root for food beneath the soil surface. They usually travel in family groups, with few natural predators. They look pokey, but can move very fast on those little legs, and will charge if they feel threatened. Their tusks can do life threatening damage, so steer clear of them if you see them in the wild.

They are considered a destructive habitat menace in Northern California and in our Central California ag areas; ranchers have hunts on their land to keep numbers down. So much so, that hunting hounds are becoming the dog of choice among young aggies. You will see Walker and other big hounds tethered on the backs of ranch trucks alongside the familiar cattle dogs of past decades.

 

 COMMENT 348099P agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-29 08:31 AM

The visitors center may have been old ranch HQ; many parks in AZ are old ranches that have been given to the State for open space and they maintain the old buildings as part of the history of the place. As for the landscape, that's what AZ looks like--they don't try to make it look like LA or LV--it's very dry and the seasons follow naturally. Spring could actually be very pretty, or after a summer monsoon (July-August). The desert plants seem to grow overnight and flowers of amazing forms, colors and shapes open in just a few hours after rains... pretty amazing to witness.

 

 COMMENT 348246 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-29 11:15 AM

I am told that they roast well in the ground, and are hunted for food.

 

 COMMENT 348333 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-29 01:12 PM

@8094P - I think you are getting our CA wild boar population (family Suidae) mixed up with the javelina (family Tayassuidae) down in Az. They share many of the traits you mention, but they are a different critters.

Some key differences:
Javelina are generally a lot smaller than boar (pigs)
Javelina don't have tails.
Javelina have much smaller litters (one or two per)
Male javelina will run with the herd, whereas male boar are solitary.
Javelina are not as toothy as boar - they don't have the big dangerous curved teeth that a big boar can have
Javelina are stinkier than boar (ergo the moniker "skunk pig")

They are still destructive little buggers, though.

 

 DEEKER agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-29 04:44 PM

Great story, Andy - love it!

 

 COMMENT 348464 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-29 04:53 PM

My husband was stationed at Ft Huachuca in the mid 50s. When they had field exercises they were warned to be careful of the javelina and the buffalo because both would charge you and were very dangerous. Saw some of each on the base frequently.

 

 COMMENT 348595P agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-29 10:25 PM

333: thanks for the correction. Did not realize they're from diff families. From what I've read about the destruction of habitat in Calif, there seems to be a diff of opinion as to the genetics of the wild pigs as the locals call them. Some feel they are feral crosses between escaped domestic pigs and European boars imported for hunting late 1800's early 1900's. Some feel they are ___??? Is there a true native Calif wild pig?

 

35% of comments on this page were made by Edhat Community Members.

 

 

Add Your Comments

Edhat Username

password (email)

Comment

Don't have an Account?

Don't know if you have an account?

Don't remember your account info?

CLICK HERE


ENJOY HAPPY HOUR! ... Between 4:00pm & 5:00pm only happy comment are allowed on the Edhat Comments Board.

If you can't say something nice, don't say nothing at all.

 
Hide Your Handle
NOTE: We are testing a new Comment Preview Page. You must hit OK on the next page to have your comment go live. Send Feedback to ed@edhat.com.
 

get a handle   |  lost handle

 

EDHAT COMMENTS POLICY

 

# # # #

 

Send this article to a friend
Your Email  
Friend's Email  


[ easy-to-print version of this page ]

 

 

  Home Subscribe FAQ Jobs Contact copyright © 2003-2011  
Edhat, Inc.